COLONIAL, PROCLAMATION & CONVICT PERIOD
COINAGE,
circa 1650 - 1853 AD.

Photos
(Click to enlarge)

Description

Price  

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TO PLACE AN ORDER:

If you wish to make a purchase, please send an email to  oldcoins@senet.com.au or telephone, Midday to 6pm AEST - Monday to Friday, 08 8165 3446 to confirm your purchase.

If necessary, leave a phone message and a time to call and you will be answered. 

The Australian Proclamation of 1800 fixed 11 world coin values in Australia at a higher value than overseas. This was an attempt to keep overseas coins in Australia. The coins mentioned in the Proclamation were: Portuguese Johanna & Half Johanna, Netherlands Ducat & Guilden, Indian Mohur, Pagoda & Rupee, Spanish Dollar, Great Britain Guinea, Shilling and Penny. These coins all had a higher value in Australia than elsewhere during the period 1800-1825. Fractionals of the above mentioned coins were eagerly accepted. The Australian Proclamation coinage values were repealed by the Monetary Act of 1825, following the introduction of quantities of British coins produced after 1815. British coins of any denomination available were traded in Australia during the Proclamation period, 1788 - 1825 and were readily accepted as currency right up to about 1920, after which British silver coins began to have considerably less silver content than Australian coins.

Transportation of convicts to Australia began with the first fleet in 1788 and ended with the coming of the Gold Rush in the early 1850s. Transportation was, in fact, another version of slavery and many were harshly sentenced for comparatively minor crimes. It was a source of cheap labour and a chance for England to rid itself of excess population, caused in part by the Industrial Revolution.  

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Photocopies of the chapter of "Proclamation" coins 1788-1825, by Greg McDonald  (Australia's foremost numismatic author). His highly informative and well researched 10 page essay reproduced here for your education on this fascinating series. Prices are WAY out of date (written 1991) but the background info is fascinating.  Post included. OTHER  McDonald Publications available - please ask.

$10        

 for         

10          

page      

essay    

Booklet, Colonial Coins of Tasmania 1803-1876 by Roger McNeice, OAM. Softback, 44 pages, gives useful information about Tasmanian coinage from this period. Used, a couple of biro marks, good overall  condition.    $15

Click on thumbnail image to see larger photo.

Silver Pieces of eight or Spanish 8 reales and their fractions, were traded widely between 1550 and 1850 and adopted as currency by a number of countries including Australia... Machine made pieces of eight or dollars were legal tender in Australia, 1788-1825.

$         

Hand made pieces of 8 were made from the 1500s to about 1700.  Made mostly from South American silver. These were sought after by traders, citizens and pirates alike. Gold Escudos were known as Cobs and traded in fractions from 8 Escudos down to 1 Escudo.


Early Australian
Numismatic
Connection from 1656.

Wreck discovered by Alan Robinson.

Gilt Dragon Shipwreck. A fascinating part of early Australian European history.

Gilt Dragon Shipwreck.  She sank 5 km off the South western WA coast after running into a reef on 28th April 1656. Of the 193 souls aboard, only 75 made it to shore and 7 then sailed for Batavia to get help. Despite two searches from ships at Batavia, none of the other 68 people were ever found. The coins from this wreck form an interesting part of early Australian numismatic history.  Although rather crude, these coins are historically fascinating, tangible proof that the Dutch knew about Australia and were sailing along its shores many years before Cook. These coins have WA Museum certificates and the buyer is required to submit some paperwork to the museum, which the seller will provide.

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Gilt Dragon Shipwreck set of three coins, 8 reales, 4 reales and two reales.
SPAIN, Mexico Philip IV (1621-1665) date not visible but circa 1650s, silver 2 reales, 25mm, 6.36 grams. Near Fine. Cert number 13197.
SPAIN, Mexico Philip IV (1621-1665) date not visible but circa 1650s, silver 4 reales, 30mm, 12.81 grams. Cert Number 3267. Fine.

SPAIN, Mexico Philip IV (1621-1665) date not visible but circa 1650s, silver 8 reales, 40mm, 26.51 grams. Cert Number 13210 Good metal for type, Fine.

Three coins in group, one each of the eight, four and two reales coins from the Gilt Dragon shipwreck.
$1250

Gilt Dragon Shipwreck.
SPAIN, Mexico Philip IV (1621-1665) date not visible but circa 1650s, silver 2 reales, 25mm, 6.01 grams. Cert Number 13201. Fine.
Sold

Probably from the Gilt Dragon Shipwreck.
SPAIN, Mexico Philip IV (1621-1665) date not visible but circa 1650s, silver 4 reales, 30mm, 13.24 grams. Fine. The museum were unsure about this one, genuine coin, appears to be from a shipwreck, but not sure which one. Cert 12937.
Sold

Gilt Dragon Shipwreck.
SPAIN, Mexico Philip IV (1621-1665) date not visible but circa 1650s, silver 4 reales, 13.30 grams. Fine. Cert number 13196.
$375

Gilt Dragon Shipwreck.
SPAIN, Mexico Philip IV (1621-1665) 1652 silver 4 reales, 13.24 grams. Good Fine. Cert Number 13200.
Sold

Gilt Dragon Shipwreck.
SPAIN, Mexico. Philip IV (1621-1665) silver 8 reales, 25.51 grams, 40mm, date not visible but mostl likely from 1652-53 period, Near Very Fine. Cert number 13202.
$650

Gilt Dragon Shipwreck.
SPAIN, Mexico. Philip IV (1621-1665) 1652 silver 8 reales, 25.42 grams, 40mm, with visible date, VF for type. 
Sold

Gilt Dragon Shipwreck.
SPAIN, Mexico. Philip IV (1621-1665) 1653 silver 8 reales, 26.34 grams, 40mm, with visible date, about VF for type. Cert number 3418.
$750

Gilt Dragon Shipwreck.
SPAIN, Mexico. Philip IV (1621-1665) 1653 silver 8 reales, 25.81 grams, 40mm, with visible date, VF for type. Cert number 13198.
$795
Machine made Spanish dollars and their fractionals. These were accepted as currency in Australia up to 1825.
Proclamation Coins:

Peru Charles IIII 2 Reales 1792IJ. VG/F. $40

Ferdinand VII 1812JP 2 Reales VG/F. $35
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save.

SPAIN. (Mexico Mint) Philip V. 1741 Silver 8 Reales or Pillar Dollar.  38mm, 26.8 grams. A famous trade coinage type, the milled version of the "Piece of Eight" Ex shipwreck, VF.

Sold

SPAIN, Peru, 1808 Charles IV. Bust Silver Dollar. (38mm, 26.8 grams) Very Fine.

Sold

1813 Holey Dollar & Dump replica pair.  Marked copy, good quality and the originals cost thousands. 40mm and 19mm.

Produced in 1813, this is Australia's first locally made coinage and was done by punching the centre out of a Spanish dollar (5 shillings) and engraving into the host coin "New South Wales 1813" and also "Five Shillings"  The Dump was over struck with a British crown and had the value if Fifteen Pence. The originals cost $40,000 to $500,000 for the pair, depending on condition.
$30
Spanish & Portugese Gold coins from the Proclamation period.

NETHERLANDS. Utrecht or similar.  1788 Copper Duit.  Approx 22mm. KM #91. G/VG with old colour and an excellent date for Australians, similar to photo. 

In the 1600’s, the “Golden Age” of Dutch history, the Netherlands became a great sea and colonial power. This was due, in no small part, to the Dutch East India Company (Vereenigde Oostindishche Compagnie, or VOC, in Dutch). The VOC was the first company in the world to issue stock, and by 1669, it had become the richest private company the world had ever seen, with over 150 merchant ships, 40 warships, 50,000 employees, and a private army of 10,000 soldiers. The VOC assumed many of the functions of the government of the Netherlands, including minting coins, which circulated wherever the Dutch settled or traded.
Manhattan was discovered on September 11, 1609 by Henry Hudson, commander of the VOC ship, the Half Moon. The province of New Netherland (which later became the State of New York) was created in 1624. Its capital was New Amsterdam, which lay on the southern tip of Manhattan— “purchased” from the Indians by Peter Minuit for $24 in trade goods. Of course, the Indians had no concept of land ownership, and only later discovered what the Dutch had in mind when they were handing out trinkets. Because the Dutch were instrumental in the early development of New York, Dutch coinage joined the Spanish, Portuguese, and British coins that were used for daily transactions all over the American colonies. One of the coins used in old New York was the VOC copper duit, now popularly known as the “original New York penny”
$25

NETHERLANDS. 1723 Gelderland. 31mm. Silver Guilder, Very Fine. KM #65.3

$200

NETHERLANDS. 1763 Gelderland, 31mm. Silver Guilder, Fine. KM #100.1

$135

NETHERLANDS. 1763 Gelderland, 31mm, Silver Guilder, Good Fine. KM #100.1

$150

NETHERLANDS. 1764 West Friesland, 31mm. Silver Guilder, Near very Fine. KM # 97.5

$165

NETHERLANDS. 1764 Utrecht. 31mm. Silver Guilder, Fine/Good Fine. KM # 102.3

$145

NETHERLANDS. 1794 West Friesland Silver Guilder, 31mm, Nice metal, Very Fine. KM #97.5

Sold

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INDIAN coins traded as legal tender in Australia during this period 1800-1825

Aust      

INDIA. British India, Benghal Presidency 1793-1818 period.  EIC Silver Quarter Rupee, 17mm, Calcutta mint, in the name of Shah Alam II, VF. $40
INDIA. British India, Benghal Presidency 1819-1829 period.  EIC Silver Quarter Rupee, 17mm, Calcutta mint, VF. $35
INDIA. British India, Benghal Presidency 1793-1818 period.  EIC Silver Half Rupee, 22mm, Calcutta mint, in the name of Shah Alam II, VF. $50
INDIA, British India, Benghal Presidency 1793-1818 period.  EIC Silver Rupee, 27mm, Murshidabad mint, in the name of Shah Alam II, VF. Oblique milling, contrasting tone, VF.$65
INDIA. British India,  Benghal Presidency 1791-1793 period.  Silver Rupee, 24mm, Murshidabad mint, in the name of Shah Alam II, VF. Sold
INDIA. British India,  Benghal Presidency 1819-1832 period.  EIC Silver Rupee, 27mm, Murshidabad mint. Vertical milling, VF.$65
INDIA. British India,  Benghal Presidency 1830-33 period.  EIC Silver Half Rupee, 22mm, Murshidabad mint. Plain edge, toned, VF.$45
INDIA. British India,  Benghal Presidency 1830-33 period.  EIC Silver Rupee, 27mm, Murshidabad mint. Plain edge, toned, VF.$50
INDIA, Bengal Presidency, EIC, gold quarter mohur, Murshidabad type (1793), 15mm, 3.07 grams. Calcutta Mint, KM #100. Some marks, very fine and scarce.$495

India. Gold Mohur of the Benghal Presidency 1793. East India Company Gold Mohur, 26mm, Murshidabad (Calcutta) mint. Dated AH 1202; RY 19 of Shah Alam II Couplet in five lines; AH date in lower field; mint secret mark present / “Struck Murshidabad year 19 of reign associated with prosperity” in Arabic. Edge: grained left. KM 102. Some contacts and edge marks, Very Fine, rare.Sold

Portugal, Brazil, John V, 12,800 reis or Johanna, 1729M.  (Minas Gerais) (KM.139). Well struck, tiny punch mark on right of reverse near the rim, otherwise good very fine and rare.$5950

Portugal. Brazil. 1790R Gold Half Johanna. Maria I. KM 226. Extremely Fine, rare. 

Sold

Click photo to enlarge.

BRITISH Coins from the c1700-1825 period. These were the most often encountered in Colonial Australia and most were legal tender up to 1910 and indeed, many were used in Australia up to the 1960s. 

Listed in denomination value descending from 1 Guinea.  See our "Machine Made coins circa 1650-1950" section of this website for many more British coins circa 1650s to 20th century.

Aust      

Click photo to enlarge.

Guinea & Johanna coin weights in brass from George II & George III period. 

Nice little range from the "First World War" c 1670-1815 where England, Holland, France & Spain fought for domination of the "New World"

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GB George II 1748 Guinea coin weight. In brass, 24mm diameter, antique colour, Fine.

   $40

GB George II c1740s Half Guinea coin weight.  In brass, 17mm diameter, gVF.

   $40

GB George II c1740s Guinea coin weight.  In brass, 20mm diameter, aVF/VF.

   $45

GB George II c1740s Guinea coin weight.  In brass, 19mm diameter, with crown counterstamp, VF.

   $30

GB George III 1772 Guinea coin weight. In brass, 19mm diameter, with counter stamp, VF.

   $35

GB George III Guinea coin weight, circa 1770s.  In brass, 19mm diameter, with portrait and crown counterstamp, F/VF.

   $35

GB. George III, circa 1770 Half Guinea coin weight (10s 6d) In brass, 18mm diameter, antique tone, VF.

   $25

GB. George III, circa 1770 Half Guinea coin weight (10s 6d). In brass, 18mm diameter, with crown counterstamp, some lustre, EF.

   $35

GB. George III, 1821 Third Guinea coin weight. (7/-)  In brass, 15mm diameter, gVF.

   $30

GB George III period, I/4th Guinea coin weight for 5s 3d (Quarter  Guinea).  In brass, 13mm diameter, VF.

   $30

GB George III period, I/4th Guinea coin weight for 5s 3d (Quarter  Guinea).  In brass, 13mm diameter, some lustre, EF.

   $40

GB George III period, 4/6d coin weight.  In brass, 14mm diameter, VF.

  $30

GB 18th century Johanna coin weight for 3 pound twelve. (72/-) In brass, 26mm diameter, antique colour, VF+

Sold        

GB 18th century Johanna coin weight for 3 pound twelve. (72/-) In brass, 26mm diameter, antique colour, some edge blemishes, VF.

 $45        

GB 18th century Half  Johanna coin weight for 36 shillings.  In brass, 24mm diameter, toned, aVF/VF.

   $35

GB 18th century Half  Johanna coin weight for 36 shillings.  In brass, 24mm diameter, VF/gVF.

   $25

GB 18th century Half  Johanna coin weight for 36 shillings.  In brass, 24mm diameter, antique colour, near VF.

 $40        

GB 18th century Half Johanna coin weight for 36 shillings.  In brass, 24mm diameter, high grade, EF.

Sold        

GB 18th century coin weight for 27 shillings. (One Moidore)  In brass, 20mm diameter, antique tone, Very Fine.

   Sold

GB 18th century coin weight for 18 shillings (1/4 Johanna).  In brass, 18mm diameter, Very Fine.

    Sold

Great Britain I/4 Johanna coin weight for 18 shillings.  In brass, 26mm diameter, some flan faults, otherwise EF with lustre and seldom seen.

 $40        

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British coins from crown to penny, 1662-1825. These were what was mostly traded in colonial Australia. Many more British coins available in the "Machine Made Coins" section of this website. Medals of relevance to the period listed first, then listed in order of denomination descending from Crown to sixpence.

$          

GB. Sir Joseph Banks 1820.  (38mm, 32 g). Silver Prize medal, uninscribed, bearing a fine portrait of Joseph Banks, with a rich antique tone. Extremely Fine.$140
GB. Sir Joseph Banks 1820.  (38mm, 32 g). Silver Prize medal,  bearing a fine portrait of Joseph Banks, with antique tone. Inscribed F.Ducane Godman Esq FRS. Rhododendrons Feb 28th 1905. Extremely Fine.

Sir Joseph Banks, 1st Baronet, GCB, PRS (13 February 1743 – 19 June 1820) was an British naturalist, botanist and patron of the natural sciences. He took part in Captain James Cook's first great voyage (1768–1771). Banks is credited with the introduction to the Western world of eucalyptus, acacia, mimosa, and the genus named after him, Banksia. Approximately 80 species of plants bear Banks's name. Banks was also the leading founder of the African Association, a British organization dedicated to the exploration of Africa, and a member of the Society of Dilettanti, which helped to establish the Royal Academy.  
It was Banks's own time in Australia, however, that led to his interest in the British colonisation of that continent. He was to be the greatest proponent of settlement in New South Wales, as is hinted by its early colloquial name, Botany Bay. The identification might have been even closer, as the name "Banksia" was proposed for the region by Linnaeus. In the end a genus of Proteaceae was named in his honour as Banksia.  

In 1779 Banks, giving evidence before a committee of the House of Commons, had stated that in his opinion the place most eligible for the reception of convicts "was Botany Bay, on the coast of New Holland". His interest did not stop there, for when the settlement was made, and for 20 years afterwards, his fostering care and influence was always being exercised. He was in fact the general adviser to the government on all Australian matters. He arranged that a large number of useful trees and plants should be sent out in the supply ship Guardian which, however, was wrecked, and every vessel that came from New South Wales brought plants or animals or geological and other specimens to Banks. He was continually called on for help in developing the agriculture and trade of the colony, and his influence was used in connection with the sending out of early free settlers, one of whom, a young gardener George Suttor, afterwards wrote a memoir of Banks. The three early governors, Arthur Phillip, John Hunter, and Philip Gidley King, were continually in correspondence with him. He was interested in the explorations of Matthew Flinders, George Bass and Lieutenant James Grant, and among his paid helpers were George Caley, Robert Brown and Allan Cunningham.  
$150
GB. George III. 1760-1820. Silver Emergency Issue  Dollar. Oval countermark in the centre of obverse of Charles IIII Mexico City Mint eight reales, 1795FM (S.3765a). Peripheral tone, good very fine.
In the late 18th century, the circulating coinage in Britain was in a pathetic state. Counterfeit coins, both in copper and silver, were the rule, rather than the exception. The Royal mint, rather than competing with the flood of false issues, simply shut its doors.
In 1788, industrialist Matthew Boulton stepped in to attempt reform the copper coinage where the government would not. A wealthy industrialist and partner of the steam-engine inventor James Watt, Boulton had made his fortune manufacturing other small metallic objects. Using the steam technology at his disposal, he created the first modern mint at Soho in Birmingham. Yet Boulton was initially unable to obtain a patent to strike coinage and instead opened his mint to merchants. The vast majority of provincial tokens struck in England at this time originated from the Soho mint
.
Meanwhile, the Bank of England endeavored to stabilize the silver coinage. Taking Spanish eight reales coins, they stamped on them a small image of King George, valuing them at a dollar or five shillings. This simple solution did not fare well with the public; the silver value of these coins being only about 4s and 4d. The failed issue spawned a popular rhyme, “The Bank to make their Spanish dollars pass, stamped the head of a fool on the neck of an ass.” The Bank soon turned to Boulton and his steam presses. By 1805, fully struck 1804 dollars from the Soho mint could be seen in change.
Sold
GB. George III. 1760-1820. Silver Emergency Issue Half Dollar.  Oval countermark on a Spain, Charles IIII, four reales, 1792MF (Madrid Mint) (S.3767) Engraved with script MG surrounded by floral flares as decorative, toned, good fine and scarce.
 Ex Bill Mira collection.
$950
GB. George III. 1804. Bank of England dollar.  
40mm, S3678, Very Fine, attractive tone and scarce.
$495

GB/Australia. George III. 1808. Retrospective Pattern Crowns.  39mm, base metals, they show what coins MIGHT have looked like, had Australia produced them during this period.$

1808 Pattern crown, aluminum.$10
1808 Australian Pattern crown, nickel.$10

1808 Australian Pattern crown, antique finish.$10
1808 Australian Pattern crown, gold finish.$15

Great Britain. 1812 George IV 3/- Bank of England silver token.  S 3770. Usual contacts and strike, very attractive, EF.

$240      

GB. HANOVER. George II. 1727-1760.  Silver Halfcrown (33mm, 15.09g). LIMA issue. London mint. Dated 1746. Laureate, draped, and cuirassed bust left; LIMA below / Crowned cruciform coat-of-arms around Garter Star. ESC 606; SCBC 3695A. VF. $250 

GB. George III 1817 Half Crown.  Bull or Large Head type. 32mm, 14.02 grams. Seaby 3788. Extremely Fine.

$250      

GB. George IV 1821 Half Crown.  Bull or Large Head type. 32mm, 14 grams. Good Very Fine.

$295

GB. George III. 1811 1/6d Bank Token.  S 3771. Bust draped in armour type. Antique tone, Very Fine.

 $85

GB. George III. 1812 1/6d Bank Token.  S 3771. Bust draped in armour type. Attractive, near EF.

$125

GB. George III. 1811 1/6d Bank Token.  S 3771. Bust draped in armour type. Antique tone, a lovely coin, EF.

$175

GB. George II. 1758 Shilling. 
S 3704. A few contacts, etc, VF. 

$100

GB. George III. 1787 Shilling. 
S 3743. No hearts. Some obverse marks and contacts, VF. 

$95

GB. George III. 1787 Shilling. 
S 3743. Antique tone, VF.
Was it on the first fleet in 1787?

$100

GB. George III. 1787 Shilling. 
S 3743. Antique tone, near VF.
Enamalled in several colours.

$100

GB. George III. 1787 Shilling. 
S 3743. Dark antique tone, VF.
Was it on the first fleet in 1787?

Sold

GB. George III. 1787 Shilling. 
S 3743. No hearts. Nice old tone, VF.

Sold
GB. George III. 1816 silver shilling. S 3790. Antique tone, near EF.$100
GB. George III. 1817 silver shilling. S 3790. Good Very Fine.$85
GB. George III. 1820 silver shilling. S 3790. Very Fine.$65
GB. George III. 1762 silver threepence. S3753. Good Very Fine.$65
GB. George III. 1762 silver threepence. S3753. Very Fine.$60
GB George III 1797 2d Cartwheel Pennies.
Australian Proclamation Period coins.

Click smaller photo to see larger photo.

Official Great Britain copper coins from George I, II & III circulated very widely in Australia and America, pre 1825. 1797 Cartwheel pennies and 2d were much used and some were defaced as a sign of anger towards Geo III, some were made into smugglers coins, some into love tokens, also they were often used as weights, as they weighed exactly 1 oz for the 1d and 2 oz for the 2d. The penny forms part of the Australian Proclamation Coin series used 1800-1825 period.

$           

GB, CAPTAIN JAMES COOK. 1784 Bronze medal by Pingo.  43mm. (MH 374, BHM 258, Eimer 780) Minor marks, near EF and rare, only 574 made, sold at the time of minting for Half a Guinea (10s 6d)
James Cook had first seen the Americas when, as a Master of the Mercury he surveyed the St Lawrence River as part of General Wolf's Expedition to capture Quebec. He continued to serve on the North American station until 1767. He twice circumnavigated the world, first in 1768-71 and later 1772-1775. Discovered the east coast of Australia in 1770. He had left on his 3rd voyage in 1776 and was killed by natives of the Sandwich islands in 1779. The Royal Society issued this medal in 1784 in the following quantities - Gold 19, Silver 291 and Bronzed Copper 574.
$1350

GB. 1797. Cartwheel Twopenny.  S 3776. Usual rim bruises, a bit better than average, VF.

First coins made in Great Britain using the steam press by Watt & Boulton and historically interesting as such. Could be used as a weight, the 1d weighs 1oz and the 2d is 2 oz. Could be used as a measure. Were unpopular as currency because of their weight. Used in Colonial Australia & America.
Sold

GB. 1797. Cartwheel Twopenny.  S 3776. Some marks and contacts, near VF.

$85

GB. 1797. Cartwheel Twopenny.  S 3776. Some marks and contacts, near VF.

Sold

GB. 1797. Cartwheel Twopenny.  S 3776. Some marks and contacts, gF.

$75
1797 GB Cartwheel Pennies.
Australian Proclamation Coin.
GB. 1797. Cartwheel Penny pattern.  A Soho pattern or trial piece which saw some circulation. Very Rare, F/gF.$495

GB. George III 1797 Cartwheel Penny.  S 3777. Proclamation coin, decent mid grade, nice reverse, VF/gVF.

First coins made in Great Britain using the steam press by Watt & Boulton and historically interesting as such. Could be used as a weight, the 1d weighs 1oz and the 2d is 2 oz. Could be used as a measure. Were unpopular as currency because of their weight. Used in Colonial Australia & America. Australian Proclamation coin type.
Sold
GB. George III 1797 Cartwheel Penny.  S 3777. Proclamation coin, Decent detail remains, Fine.Sold

GB. George III 1797 Cartwheel Penny.  S 3777. Proclamation coin, lower average circulated grade, G/VG, but not completely worn, similar to photos.

$25
Australian convict and colonial era small change coinage, c 1788-1830s period pennies, halfpennies, farthings.

Great Britain. 1806  Penny of George III.   S 3780. VF or better with old colour.

$65        

Great Britain. 1806  Penny of George III.   S 3780. Some roughness, VF.$35 
Great Britain. 1806  Penny of George III.   S 3780. Fine.$20
Great Britain. 1775 Halfpenny of George III.  S3774. About Fine.$15
Great Britain. 1799 Halfpenny of George III.  S3778. gF.$20
Great Britain. 1799 Halfpenny of George III.  S3778. Fine.$15

Great Britain. 1806  Halfpenny of George III.  S 3781. Minor obverse tone mark, otherwise with sharp strike and lovely original colour, gVF or better.

Sold        

Great Britain. 1806  Halfpenny of George III.   S 3781. Decent mid grade coin, VF.

$25        

Great Britain. 1806  Halfpenny of George III.   S 3781. Fine, similar to photos.$15
Great Britain. 1773 Farthing of George III.  Seaby 3775. Average circulated grade, About Fine, similar to photos.$25  


 

Great Britain. 1822 Farthing of George IV.  S 3822. Tiny edge bruise, Britannia Higher variety, VF.

$25        

Great Britain. 1825 Farthing of George IV.  S 3822. gVF.

 $20  
Convict and other related items.
GB Pass Token.  Pass Water. Rabbit running, 26mm, c 18th-19th century, presumably a Game-Keepers or similar pass, holed for suspension, interesting.$100
Convict: Van Diemen's Land:
185x Ticket of Leave (a pass to allow convict to travel between his place of work & designated destination) issued by Police Office in closest town. Original unissued form printed in black on wove paper with counterfoil. Approx 110 x 200mm. Minor ageing, gVF. Scarce.
Sold
Convict. 1853 Cessation of Transportation medal.  White metal, 58mm, Carlisle 1853/2. gVF.Sold
Convict Love Token. Mary Boyd.  c1820 Convict Love token on halfpenny. Engraved Mary Boyd with neatly engraved tree, 28mm, 7.55 grams.
Convict records list two women with this name. The first was convicted at Bristol Quarter Sessions for a term of seven years on April 9th, 1819. She was transported to NSW on the ship "Morley" with 120 prisoners, arriving 17th May 1820. The second Mary Boyd was with 170 convicts arriving on the "Asia" on 9 Mar 1847. She was convicted at Central Criminal Court for a term of 7 years on Nov 23, 1846 and sent to Van Diemens Land (Tasmania)  Attributable Love Tokens are very rare. Ex Dave Allen collection, ex Stewart Wright.  
$2500

 

NUMISMATIC SOCIETY OF SA.

Do you live in or near Adelaide and have an interest in coins, medals or banknotes?

The NSSA meets 3rd Thursday of each month in rooms behind the State Library on Kintore Ave, Adelaide City, from 7.45pm. Small but friendly and dedicated group of collectors, always welcomes new members and visitors. Annual subscription cost is very modest. Meeting usually lasts about 2 hours. Members are encouraged to bring along their items to discuss. Coin magazines and lists available to peruse. Light supper provided. More details: call Richard on 08 8165 3446 between midday and 7pm - Monday to Friday.

 

 

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